September 2018

Solar PPAs are an affordable way to access the benefits of solar electricity

5 FAQs about solar PPAs

In some of our previous posts, we’ve alluded to the benefits of a solar PPA: both as a way to provide more options for business owners wanting to go solar, and as a way of reducing costs in certain sectors. At this point, you may be convinced that solar finance is an affordable way to access green energy for your company, but you may have a few questions. In this blog, we explore the 5 most common questions about the most common form of solar finance, the solar power purchase agreement or PPA.

Why a PPA?

As we mentioned in the previous blog, a solar PPA usually enables an electricity consumer to utilise solar energy at a rate that is cheaper than the existing utility. In addition the ownership of the solar system remains with the PPA provider, and the user only pays for the electricity that they consume, rather than for the overall cost of the solar system – making it an affordable choice for several sectors. Below follow some of the most frequently asked questions about solar PPAs.

1) How long does a solar PPA last?

In fact, this question gets asked so often that we wrote an article about how long solar PPAs are already, and if you’d like a detailed answer to the question, have a look at that article. The summarised answer is, “it depends”. Whilst as a rule of thumb, the longer the PPA, the greater the  immediate cost-savings will apply, many businesses prefer to enter into a shorter PPA period for a higher tariff, after which time the system ownership is transferred to the energy user. It all depends on the requirements of the client, as well as the overall objectives of the project.

2) Do I have to own the building to enter into a solar PPA?

PPAs ideally take place between a building owner and an energy provider, since the construction and ongoing maintenance, as well as energy distribution throughout the building, will require the building owner’s input and buy-in. However, if the building owner agrees to make the rooftop available for the solar system and the agreement takes the building and end user into account, tenants may be able to enter into a PPA.

3) If it isn’t sunny, do I still pay?

Depending on the type of PPA agreement you enter into, you shouldn’t have to pay if the system is not generating energy (take into consideration though, that even on cloudy days solar systems generate a good amount of power). However, the opposite does apply: if it is very sunny and producing more than what the building is consuming, the client may be liable for a minimum payment for the energy that is wasted, should it not be used. That is why it is essential to ensure that the system is sized correctly.

4)What happens at the end of the PPA?

Depending on the type of agreement, the system may transfer over to the client who then will take ownership of the solar system. This could work well if the building owner wishes to take  ownership of the system after a period of time. However, there can also be “early exit” options, if the property owner is concerned that the building might be sold during the PPA term. Again, each situation is different, and when entering into a PPA it is best to check if the agreement contains provision to either buy the system, or to get the new building owner to assume the PPA, should the building be sold.

5)What is included in the PPA tariff?

Depending on the type of agreement you enter into, the tariff will include the costs of designing the system, procuring all necessary components, and constructing the system on the suitable rooftop or ground-mounted area so that the solar electricity is readily available for the client. The tariff also includes the costs of maintaining the system on an ongoing basis, such as cleaning and part replacement as needed. Typically, these combined costs will be similar, or less than utility based power when comparing on a per-kWh basis.

Are you interested in finding out more? Contact our solar finance department to learn more about our solar financing options.

Fair Cape Dairies 100 kWp solar system

When cost reduction is king: 3 sectors perfect for solar finance

If you’re in business in South Africa, you’re likely feeling the squeeze of a slow-growing economy. Whilst some sectors have been more affected than others, it is safe to say that cost reduction remains a top priority for most facilities managers in today’s economic environment. At significantly lower cost to coal-based power, solar PV is a perfect solution for reducing overall electricity costs. However, for those that do not have the capex to outlay for the purchase of a new system, solar finance options remain a good choice. In this post we’ll explore three sectors that lend themselves particularly well to solar finance.    

What is solar finance?

Solar finance usually involves a Power Purchase Agreement, or PPA, between a producer of electricity and an end-user of electricity. In the case of solar PV, this usually enables an electricity consumer, such as a building, to utilise solar energy at a cheaper rate to the existing utility. In addition, although the solar system may be installed on the user’s rooftop, the ownership of the system remains elsewhere, and the user pays for the electricity that they consume, rather than for the overall cost of the solar system.

  1. The Manufacturing Sector

Industrial processing, particularly the manufacturing sector, remains one of South Africa’s most important, given the potential to create and maintain jobs. However, in a weak economy, manufacturing is one of the first sectors to suffer: and South Africa is lagging behind its regional peers. Although South Africa needs support and policy certainty when it comes to manufacturing, it is also of chief importance that each individual facility maintains its profitability through slick and efficient and operations – and this should include using the cheapest energy.

At a much lower LCOE than grid-based power, solar is a great option for manufacturing businesses. Solar finance is especially relevant as manufacturers are not necessarily interested in owning and maintaining their own solar system – they just need to access affordable and reliable power. By entering into a solar finance option such as a solar PPA, they can maintain low operating costs and remain competitive in a struggling economy.

Dynachem Industrial manufacturing facility

Dynachem Industrial manufacturing facility, 60 kWp

  1. The Agro processing Sector

Agro processing is a subset of the manufacturing industry but focused on processing raw, agricultural materials. A key growth sector in South Africa, Agro processing has been emphasised by the Department of Trade and Industry, as well at the Eastern Cape’s Department of Economic Development, and for obvious reasons: it accounts for almost 14% of South Africa’s manufacturing sector.

Similar to the manufacturing sector, agro processing runs on a tight margin and reducing operating costs are welcome. Although the input material costs may fluctuate significantly depending on the seasons and weather, entering into a solar PPA will ensure consistently low electricity prices for the processing of the raw materials.

As an added bonus, agro processing plants are often situated in rural areas, where there is access to adequate land for ground-mounted PV solutions, or large agricultural buildings for  rooftop PV solutions.

Fair Cape Dairies 100 kWp solar system

Fair Cape Dairies 100 kWp solar system

  1. The Hospitality and conferencing sector

The hospitality sector is undeniably important to South Africa, with it contributing 9.3 % of the countries overall GDP in 2016. However, the sector is also facing challenges – as disruptive technology such as AirBnB continue to grow and tightened budgets mean less cause for business conference travel.

As any facilities manager of a hotel or conference centre will tell you, running a well-oiled ship is a key aspect of ensuring that their facility remains competitive. This means finding innovative ways to ensure costs are kept to a minimum. When budgeting, planning is very important, particularly because there are several variables year-on-year that can affect the overall cost of maintaining the facility.

This is why a solar finance option is perfect for the hospitality sector: entering into a solar PPA will ensure a fixed escalation on the cost of electricity for several years – meaning greater control when planning energy costs. Ensuring that the building management system is also optimised toward solar energy – for example, ramping up the aircon mid-morning rather than early morning – can ensure even greater savings. The bonus with a PPA, furthermore, is that the system will be operated and maintained externally – giving facilities managers one less thing to worry about.

Century City Conference Centre goes green through solar energy installed by SOLA Future Energy

Century City Conference Centre 260 kWp solar system

Solar finance options are fast-growing way of tapping in to the cost and environmental benefits of solar power. Although these three sectors here are ideal for a solar finance option such as a PPA, it is not only these sectors that can benefit. Contact us to get a sense if a solar finance option will work for you.

SOLA’s Robben Island Project wins SANEA Project of the Year Award

SOLA Future Energy has won SANEA’s Energy Project of the Year Award. The award, which recognises an energy project that has brought significant recognition internationally to South Africa’s energy environment, was given to SOLA for their design and build of Robben Island’s Microgrid – a project funded by the Department of Tourism.

The award was given based on the project meeting a stringent set of criteria, including:

  • Leadership
  • Innovation
  • Initiative
  • Role model
  • Visionary qualities
  • International recognition
  • Contribution has had impact in South Africa

The Microgrid has assisted Robben Island, historically a grim landmark of isolation and oppression, to evolve into a space for critical dialogue, remembrance, education, tourism and conservation.

The installation of a state-of-the-art microgrid on Robben Island is the largest combined solar and lithium-ion storage facility in South Africa. The Department of Tourism had set aside funding for a microgrid project with solar photovoltaic systems (PV) to improve both the island’s image and function. SOLA Future Energy was awarded the contract to design and install a PV farm comprising nearly two thousand high-efficiency modules that would generate in excess of 666 kWp.

The Robben Island Solar project is a prime example of a technologically innovative and sustainable initiative.

Since adopting a green energy system, the island has already produced 650 000 kWh of solar energy – an average of 3250 kwh per day – which has significantly reduced its reliance on traditional diesel generators, a noisy and expensive feature of the old system.

In the past, diesel had to be transported by ship from the mainland, primarily to desalinate the island’s water supply. The cost of purchasing and transporting the diesel formed a substantial portion of the island’s operating budget. From a financial perspective, the solar plant is estimated to save the island over R6 000 000 in energy costs each year. The initial cost of installing the solar plant is likely to be paid off within four years. The snowball effect of the reduced spend on fuel is, at this stage, difficult to quantify. However, the savings could be used to upgrade existing infrastructure and create jobs on the island.

Over and above the financial considerations, the noise and dust emanating from these generators were not creating a tourist-friendly environment. In terms of carbon emissions, the solar farm is expected to reduce the CO2 emissions of the island by 860 Tons per annum.

Mmekutmfon Essien, Senior Project Manager at SOLA Future Energy, receives award from the Chairperson of SANEA

Mmekutmfon Essien, Senior Project Manager at SOLA Future Energy, receives award from the Chairperson of SANEA