Tag Archive for: wheeling

Adams solar facility in the Northern Cape

What does the first large-scale wheeling project mean for South Africa?

SOLA has officially launched a first-of-its-kind 10 MW solar plant in the Northern Cape three months ahead of schedule, which provides clean energy to Amazon Web Services via the Eskom grid. Energy wheeling, a new model of private energy procurement, allows power to be generated and purchased in geographically distinct locations. The Adams Solar PV project will provide over 28 million kWh of clean electricity to Amazon Web Services annually. 

This is the first operational large-scale solar PV wheeling project in South Africa, and the model is futuristic: it uses Eskom’s grid to connect private buyers and sellers together making the way for more choice and competition.  It’s the first step forward in creating grid independence where private buyers and sellers of energy can trade with each other.

This means that the renewable energy plant will provide a low-carbon alternative to coal-fired power for a private offtaker (in this case Amazon Web Services) without needing to be geographically located at the site of use. 

How? The solar PV plant comprises over 24 000 bifacial solar modules on single axis trackers, covering an area of 20 hectares. It is situated in the Northern Cape, where the solar resource is one of the best in the world. The solar PV facility tracks the sun throughout the day and absorbs irradiance from both the sky and reflected light from the ground. This design will see over 25 000 tons of carbon emissions being avoided annually – the equivalent of taking 5400 cars off of the road for a year. 

This model could also help South Africa significantly in sticking to its carbon emission reductions targets whilst supporting economic growth and a just energy transition.

Amazon, like other large corporate consumers of energy, have committed to aggressive renewable energy procurement targets – in their case, 100% by 2025. But the successful provision of renewable energy can only be provided in an environment that supports it. Recently, the Department of Minerals and Energy, NERSA and Eskom have become supportive of renewable energy generation, which has allowed for the approval of renewable power plants such as this. 

This is great news in light of the onslaught of load shedding in South Africa. Power generated from wheeling projects will increase the amount of IPPs and relieve the sole electricity provision burden on Eskom.

The support of renewable projects means the equal prioritisation of economic and social factors. The Adams project is more than 63% black owned, with investor Mahlako a Phahla Financial Services holding stakes in the project, who are committed to delivering returns for local black investors. SOLA is also 100% South African owned, including a 40% shareholding by black investor African Rainbow Energy and Power.

Renewable energy projects which take into account local development are able to develop South African skills and provide jobs. During construction, the Adams Solar Project created 167 jobs, 63% of them from the local surrounding area, and it will sustain permanent jobs for its lifetime in electrical maintenance, cleaning and security. Wooden waste generated during construction, including pallets and electrical cable drums, were donated to local furniture businesses and special skills schools, in order to further bolster the SMME contributions of the project. 

Although the Adams Project is just the start of an energy wheeling and trading landscape in South Africa, it’s indicative of where the picture is heading: toward a modernised grid with renewable energy at its core. It also demonstrates the willingness of the government and the private sector to work together on solving South Africa’s electricity crisis.

Read more about the project here.

Can urban high-energy consumers benefit from solar PV?

It’s no surprise that high energy consumers are those that might benefit the most from renewable energy. In South Africa in particular, the coal-based electricity system means that large energy consumers carry large carbon footprints, which can undermine sustainability efforts and targets. But simply adding a few solar panels is not necessarily the answer either. 

That’s because renewable energy – in particular solar – needs space in order to effectively produce the necessary energy. For large energy consumers, the required space can be substantial – requiring a large solar farm situated in an area with excellent irradiance (solar resource). Whilst it does sometimes happen that the energy consumer is situated in an area with large land and good irradiance, this is not always the case. 

Open energy markets allow the trading of energy from different sources of production – either governmental, such as an Eskom-owned and operated coal-powered generation plant – or independent power producers (IPPs) – typically solar, wind, gas, and so forth. When energy is at its cheapest – as solar is during mid-day – consumers can buy this power and benefit from the associated cost savings. This is the type of energy market which is common overseas in places like California, where a central body facilitates the provision of power from various different sources. 

In South Africa, we are not yet at an open energy market situation. Energy is still provided almost exclusively by Eskom, with a few IPPs contributing to Eskom’s grid. But wheeling of power – forming an arrangement between an IPP and a commercial offtaker to use power via Eskom’s grid – is a possible workaround for large energy consumers. This fits with global trends that show that businesses are taking a more active role about procuring the type of power they want, according to Bloomberg.

Wheeling is essentially like a remote Power Purchase Agreement – it is a way for a corporate consumer of energy to procure electricity from an independent party. But unlike typical PPAs, wheeling enables larger amounts of power to be transferred, because the generation source – such as a solar PV system – doesn’t have to be situated geographically close to the offtaker. 

This means that a large solar farm – producing several MW of power in the highest solar resource areas of the country- could generate electricity for a high-energy consumer on the other side of the country, using the national electricity grid.

In South Africa, wheeling currently involves amending the System of Use Agreement from Eskom to stipulate that the energy can be wheeled – or generated in one source and consumed in another. The actual energy generated by the plant does not get transferred physically to the consumer, but electricity meters at either end (both at the producer and consumer) measure how much energy was generated and consumed and will be accounted for, respectively. 

The industries that can benefit from wheeling include large corporate energy consumers, such as mining operations, smelters, or data centres. All of these operations are suitable for wheeling because they are large energy consumers, but may have neither the space nor the inclination to build a large solar plant located at their operations. Wheeling agreements can ensure that they meet their sustainability targets, by reducing their carbon emissions, and cut operating costs, by procuring cheaper power when this is available.  

So wheeling can help to facilitate energy markets by allowing IPPs to produce affordable, clean power and sell it directly to corporate consumer, helping the latter to reduce costs and carbon emissions. Is there a catch?

There are a few different aspects of a wheeling agreement that can influence the tariff costs. Firstly, there are the wheeling fees, which Eskom charges in order to recoup the costs of utilising their grid to distribute power. These costs mean that economies of scale are still needed in order to make the tariff an affordable one – making wheeling suitable for very large consumers of energy only. 

Secondly, the regulatory environment can take time to navigate. In South Africa, Eskom has a wheeling framework that enables wheeling, but these agreements are still subject to approval by the National Energy Regulator, Nersa, who need to give overall permission for the arrangement. Navigating the two entities can take time, and therefore wheeling agreements typically take a while to come online. 

Nevertheless, wheeling of power has great potential to assist large energy consumers to optimise their energy loads and provide cost savings, whilst also reducing pressure on Eskom. Wheeling means that Independent Power Producers can supplement the grid and provide clean electricity to those companies that wish to procure it.